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Uncle Toms Cabin PDF book by Harriet Beecher Stowe Read Online or Free Download in ePUB, PDF or MOBI eBooks. Published in March 20th 1852 the book become immediate popular and critical acclaim in classics, fiction books. The main characters of Uncle Toms Cabin novel are Eva Hayes, Uncle Tom. Harriet Beecher Stowe by Hill, Mary, 1977. DOWNLOAD OPTIONS. 14 day loan required to access EPUB and PDF files. Feb 10, 2014 Download Uncle Tom's Cabin free in PDF & EPUB format. Download Harriet Beecher Stowe,'s Uncle Tom's Cabin for your kindle, tablet, IPAD, PC or mobile.

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HARRIET BEECHER STOWELearning ObjectivesStudents will learn about Harriet Beecher Stoweand the influence of her Cincinnati years on thewriting of her famous novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin.Students will also learn about the role of otherabolitionists in antebellum America, and theeffects of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 onenslaved people.Teacher BackgroundHarriet Beecher Stowe and her novel Uncle Tom’sCabin are inextricably tied to the American Civil War.When meeting Stowe for the first time, Abraham Lincolnreportedly said, “So you’re the little lady who started thisGreat War.” Harriet’s sentimental novel put a human faceon slavery and attracted thousands of readers to theabolitionist cause. Reportedly written as a response tothe Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, Uncle Tom’s Cabin strucka chord with the American public that no previous slavenarrative or abolitionist newspaper had been able to do.Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), a teacher andwriter, was born in Connecticut. Her father, LymanBeecher, was a well- known Presbyterian minister andheld strong beliefs about education, making sure thathis daughters as well as his sons received an education.Lyman Beecher preached against the evils of slaveryand alcohol. In 1832, Lyman Beecher was namedpresident of Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati,Ohio. Harriet, now a young woman in her twenties,moved with her father and lived in Cincinnati for the nexteighteen years. During this time, Harriet contributed tovarious periodicals and helped supplement her family’sincome through her earnings made as a writer.While living in Cincinnati, Harriet witnessed firsthand theeffects of slavery and met many well-known abolitionistsas well as people involved in the Underground Railroad.While Harriet wrote Uncle Tom’s Cabin after she leftCincinnati, the lasting impact of her Ohio experiencescan be found throughout the book. Cincinnati, acrossthe Ohio River from the slave state Kentucky, was ahotbed of activity in the abolitionist movement. SeveralLesson OverviewStudents will Watch video on Harriet Beecher Stowe Analyze a primary source: 19th centurymagazine illustration Create picture book dictionary entries onwords related to race relations Research prominent abolitionists and createAbolitionist Trading Cardsabolitionist newspapers were published in Cincinnatiand numerous contemporary abolitionists attendedLane Theological Seminary notable for its anti-slaveryactivism. Calvin Stowe, Harriet’s husband, was aprofessor at Lane Theological Seminary. Many believethat the Beechers also had strong connections to Ripley,Ohio, and the Rankin family of abolitionists who helpedlead thousands of slaves to freedom. In fact, Harriet’scharacter Eliza is modeled after a woman who made awinter escape across the Ohio River and was helped tofreedom by the Rankins.Uncle Tom’s Cabin did not begin as a novel. It was firstpublished as a serial in the anti-slavery newspaperThe National Era in 1851. Its popularity inspired thepublishers to ask Harriet to turn the series into a book.The book was published in 1852, selling 10,000 copiesin the first week alone; 300,000 copies were sold withinthe first year of its publication. Indeed, it was a bestsellerin its time. The book drew immediate criticism andcontroversy. Slaveholders violently protested the book,and even created their own counter responses, whileabolitionists praised the work for exposing the crueltiesof slavery.Today, Uncle Tom’s Cabin still elicits controversy but fordifferent reasons than those during its 1852 publication.Modern critics claim the book portrays African-Americansstereotypically and that it is a weak example of literarygreatness. Contemporary scholars are still grapplingwith the implications of the book. But, Harriet BeecherStowe’s legacy resides not simply in the pages of hernovel, but in its ability to fan the fires of pro and antislavery passions dividing our nation on the brink ofCivil War.Our Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher Stowe1

HARRIET BEECHER STOWEOhio Academic Content StandardsGrade5Grade8People in Societies3. Describe the experiences of African-Americans under the institution of slavery.History9. Explain the causes of the Civil Warwith emphasis on:A. Slavery;E. The abolitionist movement andthe roles of FrederickDouglass and John Brown;F. The addition of new states tothe Union and their impact onthe balance of power in theSenate, including the MissouriCompromise and theCompromise of 1850.People in Societies2. Describe and explain the social,economic and political effects of:A. Stereotyping and prejudice;B. Racism and discrimination.4. Analyze the economic, geographic,religious and political factors thatcontributed to:B. Resistance to slavery.2Our Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher StoweCitizenship Rights andResponsibilities1. Show the relationship betweenparticipating in civic and political lifeand the attainment of individual andpublic goals, including:B. The Underground Railroadand the abolitionist movement/Abolition of slavery.3. Evaluate the role of historical figuredand political bodies in furthering andrestricting the rights of individualsincluding:D. Frederick Douglass and theabolitionist movement;

HARRIET BEECHER STOWEMaterialsDVD playerTelevision8th-grade American history textbookDictionary (5 – 7)Thesaurus (5 – 7)Plain 3x5 index cards (for AbolitionistTrading Cards)Rulers, glue sticks, markers, coloredpencils or crayonsComputer lab with Internet accessand printerNotebook paper (for student research noteswith Abolitionist Trading Cards)ShoeboxSuggested Web sites and ResourcesThe following Web sites provide excellent information on prominent abolitionists.Ohio History Centralhttp://www.ohiohistorycentral.orgThis site provides information on Ohio history and is an excellent source for researchingOhio Abolitionists. Students can search key terms like “abolition,” “underground railroad,” orconduct searches on specific abolitionists.Abolitionism in /index.htmThis Cornell University Web site provides in depth overview of abolition in the UnitedStates with online primary source collections pertaining to Uncle Tom’s Cabin. The site alsocontains information and primary sources relating to the Emancipation Proclamation, 13thAmendment, as well as slave narratives.Africans in Americahttp://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/home.htmlThis PBS resource contains a wealth of online information chronicling the African-Americanexperience from the 15th century to present day. The Judgment Day Resource Bank includesan overview of abolition in America, biographies of abolitionists, as well as numerousprimary sources.Teacher VocabularyAbolition/AbolitionistPrimary SourceSecondary SourceFugitive Slave Act of ersyOur Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher Stowe3

Harriet Beecher Stowe by Hill, Mary, 1977. DOWNLOAD OPTIONS. 14 day loan required to access EPUB and PDF files. Download or read book entitled Uncle Tom's Cabin written by Harriet Beecher Stowe and published by Unknown online. This book was released on 10 July 1879 with total page 566 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Download or read Uncle Tom's Cabin full HQ book in pdf, epub and kindle.

HARRIET BEECHER STOWEInstructional ProcedureHarriet Beecher Stowe Anticipatory Guide1.Begin by asking students if they know who Harriet Beecher Stowe is. Based on theinformation in the Teacher Background discuss why her work Uncle Tom’s Cabin wasso important when it was written in 1852, and, why it is so controversial today.2.Next, let students know they will be watching a short video about Harriet BeecherStowe’s experience living in Cincinnati, Ohio. Before watching the Our Ohio “HarrietBeecher Stowe” video segment, distribute the Harriet Beecher Stowe Anticipatory GuideWorksheet and have students read the Anticipatory Guide statements then, in thecolumn titled “BEFORE” have students indicate if they believe the statement is Trueor False.3.Watch the Our Ohio “Harriet Beecher Stowe” video segment. After watching thevideo segment, as a class or individually, review the Anticipatory Guide statements andcomplete the “AFTER” column.Anthony Burns: Primary Source Analysis4.Review the definition of primary sources with students and write examples on theboard. Describe how we can learn things about the past by looking at primary sourcedocuments closely.5.Explain that students will be examining a primary source document from the periodof slavery in this country. Distribute the Anthony Burns: Primary Source Analysisworksheet. Have students complete the activity individually.6.After students have completed the activity, review the primary source analysisworksheet as a class and provide answers to the questions.Picture Book Dictionary Entries41.Begin by introducing the class to the controversy surrounding Uncle Tom’s Cabindescribing how some critics of the book cite stereotypical portrayals of African Americans.Some argue that the book is a product of its time and context and that Harriet BeecherStowe’s legacy resides not in the actual text of her novel, but in its ability to highlight thesocial and political fervor dividing our nation on the brink of the Civil War.2.Now, have students give examples of how racism, stereotypes, prejudice, anddiscrimination have been problems in this country historically and, are problems that stillremain today. Then ask students to offer examples of how we have overcome some ofthese obstacles in the past and how we can overcome these problems in our daily lives.Our Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher Stowe

HARRIET BEECHER STOWE3.Next, distribute the Picture Book Dictionary worksheet and hold a classroomdiscussion exploring the Picture Book Dictionary terms and their relationship withslavery in America. If students have not yet watched the Our Ohio video segment“Harriet Beecher Stowe” play the video and watch as a class. Continue the classroomdiscussion with a chalk-talk activity.4.Divide the board in half and place “Uncle Tom’s Cabin Then” on one side of the boardand “Uncle Tom’s Cabin Now” on the other. Explain to students that during this activitythere is no talking, except through written word and pictures on the board.5.Have students come to the board and write down on each side words that explainhow Uncle Tom’s Cabin might have been viewed “Then” and “Now” and why theperspectives have changed.6.Discuss student responses from the chalk-talk. Give students a few more minutes tomake any additions to their Picture Book Dictionary Entries since the discussion andcollect Picture Book Dictionary Entries worksheets when finished.Abolitionist Trading Cards1.Explain to the students that they will be conducting their own research on prominentAmerican abolitionists. Distribute Abolitionist Trading Cards Template instructions,Rubric, Suggested Web Resources, and hand out. Review the Abolitionist TradingCards instructions and rubric with students.2.Allow students to begin their research on five abolitionists of their choice. Researchshould take two to three class periods. Once research is complete, allow students tobegin creating their Abolitionist Trading Cards. Provide two to three class periods tocomplete the cards.3.After students have completed their cards and cards have been graded, instructstudents to select one of their Abolitionist Trading Cards to be placed into a box andselected by another classmate. Pass around a shoebox for students to place theirselected card in the box. Once every student has placed their card in the box, callstudents to the front to “blindly” select a card from the box. Students will swap theirAbolitionist Trading Cards with other students to learn about an abolitionist theydidn’t research.Our Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher Stowe5

HARRIET BEECHER STOWEAnswer KeyHarriet Beecher StoweAnticipatory GuideBEFOREAny answers in this column are notgraded – they are a previewing activity.AFTERTrueFalse, approximately 20 yearsTrueTrueTrueFalse, Fugitive Slave Act of 1850TrueTrueFalse, manyFalse, had a great impact on theAmerican publicAnthony Burns1.2.3.6Primary, answers will varyAnthony Burnsa. Arrest in Boston – two men withweapons are escorting Anthony Burnsb. The Escape on Shipboard – a youngman in raggedy clothes sits with pilesof bagsc. Departure from Boston – men withweapons escort Anthony Burns inhandcuffsd. The Sale – a young Anthony Burns ison a slave auction blocke. The Prison – Anthony Burns is behindprison bars.f. The Address – Anthony Burns appearsto be addressing the courtroom, possibly his lawyers in the background(Note: teachers might want to explainthat by law Anthony Burns would nothave been able to address the court.)Our Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher Stowe4.5.6.7.Anthony Burns was an escaped slavewho was returned to slavery.The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850Between 1850 and 1860Answers will vary. Anthony Burns wasan escaped slave from Virginia livingin Boston in 1854. He was arrested asa fugitive slave, and his arrest led toupheaval in Boston. At the end of thetrial Anthony Burns was forced to returnto Virginia as a slave. Within a year ofhis trial and return, a Northern churchraised enough money to purchaseBurns’ freedom, and he returned toBoston before the start of the Civil War.Picture Book Dictionary EntriesAnswers will vary for each entry. Check thesimple definition against the real definitionlisted below. A few synonyms and antonymshave been provided for each word. Whengrading the picture, look for images thatdescribe the definition instead of artisticquality.Stereotype – to categorize individualsor groups according to an oversimplified,standardized image or idea.Synonym – typecast, labelAntonym – differentiatePrejudice – a preformed opinion, usually anunfavorable one, based on insufficientknowledge, irrational feelings or inaccuratestereotypes.Synonym – bigotry, narrow-mindedAntonym – tolerance

HARRIET BEECHER STOWERacism – prejudice against people who belong to other races.Synonym – discrimination, intoleranceAntonym – tolerantDiscrimination – unfair treatment of one person or groups, usually because of prejudice aboutrace, ethnic group, age group, religion, or gender.Synonym – bias, favoritismAntonym – impartialityAbolitionist Trading CardsUse the rubric and instructions to identify lesson requirements and to guide grading.Our Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher Stowe7

HARRIET BEECHER STOWEHarriet Beecher Stowe Anticipatory GuideNAME:DATE:Instructions: Before watching Our Ohio video segment “Harriet Beecher Stowe,” read thefollowing statements. In the column titled “Before,” indicate whether you believe the statementis T (true) or F (false). Watch the Our Ohio video segment “Harriet Beecher Stowe.” After youhave watched the segment in the column titled “After,” indicate if the statement is T (true) or F(false). If the statement is false, correct the statement so it is true.BEFORESTATEMENTUncle Tom’s Cabin was inspired byactual events in Southern Ohio.Harriet Beecher Stowe lived inCincinnati her entire life.Lyman Beecher, Harriet’s father,opposed slavery.Harriet Beecher Stowe was apublished author before Uncle’sTom Cabin.Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote to helpbring in money to support her family.Uncle Tom’s Cabin was partiallywritten as a response to theMissouri Compromise.Historians believe there is a strongconnection between the Beecherand Rankin families.The Eliza character in Uncle’s TomCabin was inspired by runawayslave assisted by John Rankin.Harriet Beecher Stowe had fewabolitionist contacts while living inCincinnati.When published, Uncle Tom’s Cabinwas largely ignored by the Americanpublic.8Our Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher StoweAFTER

HARRIET BEECHER STOWEAnthony Burns: Primary Source AnalysisSee the original source at: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.htmland perform search for “Anthony Burns”Our Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher Stowe9

HARRIET BEECHER STOWEAnthony Burns: Primary Source AnalysisNAME:DATE:Instructions: Look closely at the image provided to answer the following questions. Use ablank sheet of paper if you need more room to answer the questions.1.Is this a primary or secondary source? How do you know?2.Whose life is described in the images?3.List the events described in the images. For each event, briefly describe what ishappening in the image.a. Arrest in Boston – two men with weapons are escorting Anthony Burns.b.c.d.e.f.104.Based upon this image and what you know, who was Anthony Burns?5.What historic issue inspired this image?6.When do you suppose these events took place?7.What do you think happened to Anthony Burns?Our Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher Stowe

HARRIET BEECHER STOWEPicture Book Dictionary EntriesNAME:DATE:Create four “picture-book” dictionary entries for the following words: stereotype, prejudice,racism and discrimination. For each entry you will create a simple definition in your ownwords, provide a synonym and antonym and a picture that describes what the word means.All illustrations must be appropriate. You will need your textbook, a dictionary, a thesaurusand your imagination to complete this assignment. No stick figures!STEREOTYPERACISMSimple Definition:Simple :Picture:PREJUDICEDISCRIMINATIONSimple Definition:Simple :Picture:Our Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher Stowe11

HARRIET BEECHER STOWEAbolitionist Trading CardsNAME:DATE:For this activity, you will conduct research on five abolitionists of your choice. When you areconducting research, think about the information you will include on your trading cards andgather the important information you will need.After completing your research, you will create “Abolitionist Trading Cards” for each abolitionist.Your cards must be informative and creative. Use these instructions and your rubric to helpguide the creation of your cards. Use the Abolitionist Trading Card Template to createthe cards.AbolitionistsFrederick DouglassWilliam Lloyd GarrisonSojourner TruthJohn RankinArthur Tappan and Lewis TappanCharles OsbornBenjamin LundyWendell PhillipsSarah Grimké and Angelina GrimkéJohn BrownSamuel J. MayMary Ann Shadd CarySide 1 An image of your abolitionist. You may either use a computer-generated image or draw animage of your abolitionist.The abolitionist’s name.Side 2Lifespan:Years livedProminent Role:Indicate the abolitionist’s role within the movement, such as speaker, conductor, writer,publisher, etc.Career Highlights:Indicate at least three major accomplishments.12Our Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher Stowe

HARRIET BEECHER STOWEAbolitionist Trading CardsABOLITIONIST TRADING CARDABOLITIONIST TRADING CARDABOLITIONIST TRADING CARDABOLITIONIST TRADING CARDOur Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher Stowe13

HARRIET BEECHER STOWEAbolitionist Trading Card Rubric14Category4321Card OneThe correct abolitionist’simage and nameappear on side one. Theabolitionist’s lifespan,role in the movementand career highlightsare covered in-depthon side two. The card isattractive, creative andeasy to read.The correct abolitionist’simage and nameappear on side one. Theabolitionist’s lifespan,role in the movementand career highlightsare briefly covered onside two. The card isneat and easy to read.The correct abolitionist’simage appears on sideone. The abolitionist’slifespan, role in themovement and careerhighlights are partiallycovered on side two.The card is easy to read.The correct abolitionist’sname appears on sideone. The abolitionist’slifespan, role in themovement and careerhighlights are partiallyand inaccurately coveredon side two. The card isdifficult to read.Card TwoThe correct abolitionist’simage and nameappear on side one. Theabolitionist’s lifespan,role in the movementand career highlightsare covered in-depthon side two. The card isattractive, creative andeasy to read.The correct abolitionist’simage and nameappear on side one. Theabolitionist’s lifespan,role in the movementand career highlightsare briefly covered onside two. The card isneat and easy to read.The correct abolitionist’simage appears on sideone. The abolitionist’slifespan, role in themovement and careerhighlights are partiallycovered on side two.The card is easy to read.The correct abolitionist’sname appears on sideone. The abolitionist’slifespan, role in themovement and careerhighlights are partiallyand inaccurately coveredon side two. The card isdifficult to read.Card ThreeThe correct abolitionist’simage and nameappear on side one. Theabolitionist’s lifespan,role in the movementand career highlightsare covered in-depthon side two. The card isattractive, creative andeasy to read.The correct abolitionist’simage and nameappear on side one. Theabolitionist’s lifespan,role in the movementand career highlightsare briefly covered onside two. The card isneat and easy to read.The correct abolitionist’simage appears on sideone. The abolitionist’slifespan, role in themovement and careerhighlights are partiallycovered on side two.The card is easy to read.The correct abolitionist’sname appears on sideone. The abolitionist’slifespan, role in themovement and careerhighlights are partiallyand inaccurately coveredon side two. The card isdifficult to read.Card FourThe correct abolitionist’simage and nameappear on side one. Theabolitionist’s lifespan,role in the movementand career highlightsare covered in-depthon side two. The card isattractive, creative andeasy to read.The correct abolitionist’simage and nameappear on side one. Theabolitionist’s lifespan,role in the movementand career highlightsare briefly covered onside two. The card isneat and easy to read.The correct abolitionist’simage appears on sideone. The abolitionist’slifespan, role in themovement and careerhighlights are partiallycovered on side two.The card is easy to read.The correct abolitionist’sname appears on sideone. The abolitionist’slifespan, role in themovement and careerhighlights are partiallyand inaccurately coveredon side two. The card isdifficult to read.Card FiveThe correct abolitionist’s image and nameappear on side one. Theabolitionist’s lifespan,role in the movementand career highlights arecovered in-depth on sidetwo. The card is attractive, creative and easyto read.The correct abolitionist’simage and name appearon side one. The abolitionist’s lifespan, rolein the movement andcareer highlights arebriefly covered on sidetwo. The card is neatand easy to read.The correct abolitionist’s image appears onside one. The abolitionist’s lifespan, role in themovement and careerhighlights are partiallycovered on side two.The card is easy to read.The correct abolitionist’s name appears onside one. The abolitionist’s lifespan, role in themovement and careerhighlights are partiallyand inaccurately coveredon side two. The card isdifficult to read.Our Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher Stowe

HARRIET BEECHER STOWEAbolitionist Trading Card Suggested Web sitesand ResourcesThe following Web sites provide excellent information on prominent abolitionists.Ohio History Centralhttp://www.ohiohistorycentral.orgThis site provides information on Ohio history and is an excellent source for researchingOhio Abolitionists. Students can search key terms like “abolition,” “underground railroad,” orconduct searches on specific abolitionists.Abolitionism in /index.htmThis Cornell University Web site provides in depth overview of abolition in the UnitedStates with online primary source collections pertaining to Uncle Tom’s Cabin. The site alsocontains information and primary sources relating to the Emancipation Proclamation, 13thAmendment, as well as slave narratives.Africans in Americahttp://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/home.htmlThis PBS resource contains a wealth of online information chronicling the African-Americanexperience from the 15th century to present day. The Judgment Day Resource Bank includesan overview of abolition in America, biographies of abolitionists, as well as numerousprimary sources.Our Ohio: Exploring Our Heritage III - Harriet Beecher Stowe15

Abolitionist Trading Cards 1. Explain to the students that they will be conducting their own research on prominent American abolitionists. Distribute Abolitionist Trading Cards Template instructions, Rubric, Suggested Web Resources, and hand out.

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Harriet Beecher Stowe - Wikipedia Life and work. Harriet Elisabeth Beecher was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, on June 14, 1811. She was the seventh of 13 children born to outspoken Calvinist preacher Lyman Beecher.Her mother was his first wife, Roxana (Foote), a deeply religious woman who died when Stowe was only five years old. Life Harriet Beecher Stowe Center Harriet Beecher Stowe . Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) published more than 30 books, but it was her best-selling anti-slavery novel Uncle Toms Cabin that catapulted her to international celebrity and secured her place in history. She believed her actions could make a positive difference. Harriet Beecher Stowe - biography.com For more on 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' author Harriet Beecher Stowe, whose anti-slavery writing inflamed sectional tension before the Civil War, visit Biography.com.



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