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[Cover][Frontispiece]


[Full Image]

Nile

GREAT ROCK-CUT TEMPLE, ABOU SIMBEL, NUBIA.

[Title Page]

BY

AMELIA B. EDWARDS

AUTHOR OF 'UNTRODDEN PEAKS AND UNFREQUENTED VALLEYS,' 'LORD BRACKENBURY,' 'BARBARA'S HISTORY,' ETC.
WITH UPWARDS OF SEVENTY ILLUSTRATIONS ENGRAVED ON WOOD BY G. PEARSON
AFTER FINISHED DRAWINGS EXECUTED ON THE SPOT BY THE AUTHOR.
GERTÁSSEE.
'It flows through old hushed Egypt and its sands,
Like some grave, mighty thought, threading a dream.'–LEIGHT HUNT.
LONDON
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS, LIMITED
BROADWAY, LUDGATE HILL
GLASGOW, MANCHESTER, AND NEW YORK
1891

BY THE SAME AUTHOR,
UNIFORM WITH THIS EDITION
UNTRODDEN PEAKS
AND UNFREQUENTED VALLEYS:
A MIDSUMMER RAMBLE IN THE DOLOMITES.

The

PREFACE

TO THE SECOND EDITION

FIRST published in 1877, this book has been out of print for severalyears. I have therefore very gladly revised it for a new and cheaperedition. In so revising it, I have corrected some of the historical notesby the light of later discoveries; but I have left the narrativeuntouched. Of the political changes which have come over the land ofEgypt since that narrative was written, I have taken no note; and becauseI in no sense offer myself as a guide to others, I say nothing of thealtered conditions under which most Nile travellers now perform the trip. All these things will be more satisfactorily, and more practically,learned from the pages of Baedeker and Murray.

AMELIA B. EDWARDS.

WESTBURY-ON-TRYM,
October 1888.

PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION.

'Un voyage en Égypte, c'est une partie d'ânes etune promenade en bateau entremêlées de ruines.' – AMPÈRE.

AMPÈRE has put Egypt in an epigram. 'A donkey-ride and aboating-trip interspersed with ruins' does, in fact, sum up in a singleline the whole experience of the Nile traveller. Àpropos of thesethree things – the donkeys, the boat, and the ruins – it may be said that agood English saddle and a comfortable dahabeeyah add very considerably tothe pleasure of the journey; and that the more one knows about the pasthistory of the country, the more one enjoys the ruins.

Of the comparative merits of wooden boats, iron boats, and steamers, Iam not qualified to speak. We, however, saw one iron dahabeeyah agroundupon a sandbank, where, as we afterwards learned, it remained for threeweeks. We also saw the wrecks of three steamers between Cairo and theFirst Cataract. It certainly seemed to us that the old-fashioned woodendahabeeyah – flat-bottomed, drawing little water, light in hand, and easilypoled off when stuck – was the one vessel best constructed for thenavigation of the Nile. Other considerations, as time and cost, are, ofcourse, involved in this question. The choice between dahabeeyah andsteamer is like the choice between travelling with post-horses andtravelling by rail. The one is expensive, leisurely, delightful; theother is cheap, swift, and comparatively comfortless. Those who arecontent to snatch but a glimpse of the Nile will doubtless prefer thesteamer. I may add that the whole cost of the Philæ – food,dragoman's wages, boat-hire, cataract, everything included exceptwine – was about £10 per day.

With regard to temperature, we found it cool – even cold, sometimes – inDecember and January; mild in February; very warm in March and April.The climate of Nubia is simply perfect. It never rains; and once pastthe limit of the tropic, there is no morning or evening chill upon theair. Yet even in Nubia, and especially along the forty miles which divideAbou Simbel from Wady Halfeh, it is cold when the wind blows strongly fromthe north.1

Touching the title of this book, it may be objected that the distancefrom the port of Alexandria to the Second Cataract falls short of athousand miles. It is, in fact, calculated at 964 1/2 miles. Butfrom the Rock of Abusir, five miles above Wady Halfeh, the traveller looksover an extent of country far exceeding the thirty or thirty-five milesnecessary to make up the full tale of a thousand. We distinctly saw fromthis point the summits of mountains which lie about 145 miles to thesouthward of Wady Halfeh, and which look down upon the Third Cataract.

Perhaps I ought to say something in answer to the repeated inquiries ofthose who looked for the publication of this volume a year ago. I can,however, only reply that the Writer, instead of giving one year, has giventwo years to the work. To write rapidly about Egypt is impossible. Thesubject grows with the book, and with the knowledge one acquires by theway. It is, moreover, a subject beset with such obstacles as must impedeeven the swiftest pen; and to that swiftest pen I lay no claim. Moreoverthe writer, who seeks to be accurate, has frequently to go for his facts,if not actually to original sources (which would be the texts themselves),at all events to translations and commentaries locked up in costly folios,or dispersed far and wide among the pages of scientific journals and thetransactions of learned societies. A date, a name, a passing reference,may cost hours of seeking. To revise so large a number of illustrations,and to design tailpieces from jottings taken here and there in that pocketsketch-book which is the sketcher's constant companion, has also consumedno small amount of time. This by way of apology.

More pleasant is it to remember labour lightened than to consider timespent; and I have yet to thank the friends who have spared no pains tohelp this book on its way. To S. Birch, Esq., LL.D., etc. etc., so justlystyled 'the Parent in this country of a sound school of Egyptianphilology,' who besides translating the hieratic and hieroglyphicinscriptions contained in Chapter xviii., has also, with infinitekindness, seen the whole of that chapter through the press; to ReginaldStuart Poole, Esq.; to Professor R. Owen, C.B., etc. etc.; to Sir G. W.Cox, I desire to offer my hearty and grateful acknowledgments. It issurely not least among the glories of learning, that those who adorn itmost and work hardest should ever be readiest to share the stores of theirknowledge.

I am anxious also to express my cordial thanks to Mr. G. Pearson, underwhose superintendence the whole of the illustrations have been engraved.To say that his patience and courtesy have been inexhaustible, and that hehas spared neither time nor cost in the preparation of the blocks, is buta dry statement of facts, and conveys no idea of the kind of labourinvolved. Where engravings of this kind are executed, not from drawingsmade at first-hand upon the wood, but from water-colour drawings whichhave not only to be reduced in size, but to be, as it were, translatedinto black and white, the difficulty of the work is largely increased. Inorder to meet this difficulty and to ensure accuracy, Mr. Pearson has notonly called in the services of accomplished draughtsmen, but in manyinstances has even photographed the subjects direct upon the wood. Of theengraver's work – which speaks for itself – I will only say that I do notknow in what way it could be bettered. It seems to me that some of theseblocks may stand for examples of the farthest point to which the art ofengraving upon wood has yet been carried.

The principal illustrations have all been drawn upon the wood by Mr.Percival Skelton; and no one so fully as myself can appreciate how muchthe subjects owe to the delicacy of his pencil, and to the artisticfeelings with which he has interpreted the original drawings.

Of the fascination of Egyptian travel, of the charm of the Nile, ofthe unexpected and surpassing beauty of the desert, of the ruins which arethe wonder of the world, I have said enough elsewhere. I must, however,add that I brought home with me an impression that things and people aremuch less changed in Egypt than we of the present day are wont to suppose.I believe that the physique and life of the modern Fellâh is almostidentical with the physique and life of that ancient Egyptian labourerwhom we know so well in the wall paintings of the tombs. Square in theshoulders, slight but strong in the limbs, full-lipped, brown-skinned, wesee him wearing the same loin-cloth, plying the same shâdûf,ploughing with the same plough, preparing the same food in the same way,and eating it with his fingers from the same bowl, as did his forefathersof six thousand years ago.

The household life and social ways of even the provincial gentry arelittle changed. Water is poured on one's hands before going to dinnerfrom just such a ewer and into just such a basin as we see pictured in thefestival-scenes at Thebes. Though the lotus-blossom is missing, a bouquetis still given to each guest when he takes his place at table. The headof the sheep killed for the banquet is still given to the poor. Those whoare helped to meat or drink touch the head and breast in acknowledgment,as of old. The musicians still sit at the lower end of the hall; thesingers yet clap their hands in time to their own voices; thedancing-girls still dance, and the buffoon in his high cap still performsuncouth antics, for the entertainment of the guests. Water is brought totable in jars of the same shape manufactured at the same town, as in thedays of Cheops and Chephren; and the mouths of the bottles are filled inprecisely the same way with fresh leaves and flowers. The cucumberstuffed with minced-meat was a favorite dish in those times of old; and Ican testify to its excellence in 1874. Little boys in Nubia yet wear theside-lock that graced the head of Rameses in his youth; and little girlsmay be seen in a garment closely resembling the girdle worn by youngprincesses of the time of Thothmes the First. A Sheykh still walks with along staff; a Nubian belle still plaits her tresses in scores of littletails; and the pleasure-boat of the modern Governor or Mudîr, as well asthe dahabeeyah hired by the European traveller, reproduces in allessential features the painted galleys represented in the tombs of thekings.

In these and in a hundred other instances, all of which came under mypersonal observation and have their place in the following pages, itseemed to me that any obscurity which yet hangs over the problem of lifeand thought in ancient Egypt originates most probably with ourselves. Ourown habits of life and thought are so complex that they shut us off fromthe simplicity of that early world. So it was with the problem ofhieroglyphic writing. The thing was so obvious that no one could find itout. As long as the world persisted in believing that every hieroglyphwas an abstruse symbol, and every hieroglyphic inscription a profoundphilosophical rebus, the mystery of Egyptian literature remainedinsoluble. Then at last came Champollion's famous letter to Dacier,showing that the hieroglyphic signs were mainly alphabetic and syllabic,and that the language they spelt was only Coptic after all.

If there were not thousands who still conceive that the sun and moonwere created, and are kept going, for no other purpose than to lighten thedarkness of our little planet; if only the other day a grave gentlemanhad not written a perfectly serious essay to show that the world is a flatplain, one would scarcely believe that there could still be people whodoubt that ancient Egyptian is now read and translated as fluently asancient Greek. Yet an Englishman whom I met in Egypt – an Englishman whohad long been resident in Cairo, and who was well acquainted with thegreat Egyptologists who are attached to the service of theKhedive – assured me of his profound disbelief in the discovery ofChampollion. 'In my opinion,' said he, 'not one of these gentlemen canread a line of hieroglyphics.'

As I then knew nothing of Egyptian, I could say nothing to controvertthis speech. Since that time, however, and while writing this book, Ihave been led on step by step to the study of hieroglyphic writing, and Inow know that Egyptian can be read, for the simple reason that I findmyself able to read an Egyptian sentence.

My testimony may not be of much value; but I give it for the littlethat it is worth.

The study of Egyptian literature has advanced of late years with rapidstrides. Papyri are found less frequently than they were some thirty orforty years ago; but the translation of those contained in the museums ofEurope goes on now more diligently than at any former time. Religiousbooks, variants of the Ritual, moral essays, maxims, private letters,hymns, epic poems, historical chronicles, accounts, deeds of sale,medical, magical and astronomical treatises, geographical records,travels, and even romances and tales, are brought to light, photographed,facsimiled in chromo-lithography, printed in hieroglyphic type, andtranslated in forms suited both to the learned and to the general reader.

Not all this literature is written, however, on papyrus. The greaterproportion of it is carved in stone. Some is painted on wood, written onlinen, leather, potsherds, and other substances. So the old mystery ofEgypt, which was her literature, has vanished. The key to the hieroglyphsis the master-key that opens every door. Each year that now passes overour heads sees some old problem solved. Each day brings some long-buriedtruth to light.

Trips down the nile

Some thirteen years ago,2 adistinguished American artist painted a very beautiful pictured calledThe Secret of the Sphinx. In its widest sense, the Secret of theSphinx would mean, I suppose, the whole uninterpreted and undiscoveredpast of Egypt. In its narrower sense, the Secret of the Sphinx was, tillquite lately, the hidden significance of the human-headed lion which isone of the typical subjects of Egyptian Art.

Thirteen years is a short time to look back upon; yet great thingshave been done in Egypt, and in Egyptology, since then. Edfu, withits extraordinary wealth of inscriptions, has been laid bare. The wholecontents of the Boulak Museum have been recovered from the darkness of thetombs. The very mystery of the Sphinx has been disclosed; and evenwithin the last eighteen months, M. Chabas announces that he hasdiscovered the date of the pyramid of Mycerinus; so for the first timeestablishing the chronology of ancient Egypt upon an ascertainedfoundation. Thus the work goes on; students in their libraries,excavators under Egyptian skies, toiling along different paths towards acommon goal. The picture means more to-day than it meant thirteen yearsago – means more, even, than the artist intended. The Sphinx has no secretnow, save for the ignorant.

In this picture, we see a brown, half-naked, toil-worn Fellâhlaying his ear to the stone lips of a colossal Sphinx, buried to the neckin sand. Some instinct of the old Egyptian blood tells him that thecreature is God-like. He is conscious of a great mystery lying far backin the past. He has, perhaps, a dim, confused notion that the Big Headknows it all, whatever it may be. He has never heard of the morning-songof Memnon; but he fancies, somehow, that those closed lips might speak ifquestioned. Fellâh and Sphinx are alone together in the desert. Itis night, and the stars are shining. Has he chosen the right hour? Whatdoes he seek to know? What does he hope to hear?

Mr. Vedder has permitted me to enrich this book with an engraving fromhis picture. It tells its own tale; or rather it tells as much of itsown tale as the artist chooses.

Each must interpret for himself
The Secret of The Sphinx.
Pdf

AMELIA B. EDWARDS.

WESTBURY-ON-TRYM,
GLOUCESTERSHIRE,
Dec. 1877.

CONTENTS.

CAIRO AND THE GREAT PYRAMID.

Arrival at Cairo – Shepheard's Hotel – The Moskee – The KhanKhaleel – The Bazaars – Dahabeeyahs – Ghizeh – The Pyramids.

PAGE
1

CAIRO AND THE MECCA PILGRIMAGE.

The Mosque of Sultan Hassan – Moslems at prayer – Mosque of MehemetAli – View from the Platform – Departure of the Caravan for Mecca – TheBáb en-Nasr – The Procession – The Mahmal – Howling Dervishes – TheMosque of 'Amr – The Shubra Road.

18

CAIRO TO BEDRESHAYN.

Departure for the Nile Voyage – Farewell to Cairo – Turra – The Philæand crew – The Dahabeeyah and the Nile sailor – Nativemusic – Bedreshayn.

35

SAKKÂRAH AND MEMPHIS.

The Palms of Memphis – Three groups of Pyramids – The M. B.'s andtheir groom – Relic-hunting – The Pyramid of Ouenephes – The Serapeum – A royal raid – The Tomb of Ti – The Fallen Colossus – Memphis.

47

BEDRESHAYN TO MINIEH.

The rule of the Nile – The Shâdûf – Beni Suêf – Thievesby night – The Chief of the Guards – A sand-storm – 'Holy Sheykh Cotton' – TheConvent of the Pulley – A Copt – The Shadow of the World – Minieh – A nativemarket – Prices of provisions – The Dôm palm – Fortune-telling – Ophthalmia.

69

MINIEH TOSIÛT.

Christmas Day – The Party completed – Christmas Dinner on the Nile – A Fantasia – Noah's Ark – Birds of Egypt – Gebel Abufayda – Unknown Stelæ – Imprisoned – The Scarab-beetle – Manfalût – Siût – Redand black pottery – Ancient tombs – View over the plain – Biblical legend.

88

SIÛT TODENDERAH.

An 'Experienced Surgeon' – Passing scenery – Girgeh – SheykhSelîm – Kasr es Syad – Forced labour – Temple ofDenderah – Cleopatra – Benighted.

107

THEBES ANDKARNAK.

Luxor – Donkey-boys – Topography of Ancient Thebes – Pylons ofLuxor – Poem of Pentaur – The solitary Obelisk – Interior of the Temple ofLuxor – Polite postmaster – Ride to Karnak – Great Temple of Karnak – TheHypostyle Hall – A world of ruins.

133

THEBES TOASSÛAN.

A storm on the Nile – Erment – A gentlemanly Bey – Esneh – A buriedTemple – A long day's sketching – Salame the chivalrous – RemarkableCoin – Antichi – The Fellâh – The pylons of Edfu – An excitingrace – The Philæ wins by a length.

155

ASSÛAN ANDELEPHANTINE.

Assûan – Strange wares for sale – Madame Nubia – Castoroil – The black Governor – An enormous blunder – Tannhäuser inEgypt – Elephantine – Inscribed potsherds – Bazaar of Assûan – TheCamel – A ride in the Desert – The Obelisk of the Quarry – A death in thetown.

174

THE CATARACT AND THE DESERT.

Scenery of the Cataract – The Sheykh of the Cataract – Vexatiousdelays – The Painter's vocabulary – Mahatta – Ancient bed of theNile – Abyssinian Caravan.

194

PHILÆ.

Pharoah's Bed – The Temples – Champollion's discovery – The PaintedColumns – Coptic Philæ – Philæ and Desaix – Chamber ofOsiris – Inscribed Rock – View from the roof of the Temple.

207

PHILÆ TO KOROSKO.

Nubian scenery – A sand-slope – Missing Yûsef – Trading by theway – Panoramic views – Volcanic cones – Dakkeh – Korosko – Letters fromhome.

234

KOROSKO TOABOU SIMBEL.

El-'Id el-Kebir – Stalking wild ducks – Temple of Amada – Fine art ofthe Thothmes – Derr – A native funeral – Temple of Derr – The 'fair'families – The Sakkieh – Arrival at Abou Simbel by moonlight.

244

RAMESES THEGREAT.

Youth of Rameses the Great – Treaty with the Kheta – His wives – Hisgreat works – The Captivity – Pithom and Rameses – Kauiser andKeniamon – The Birth of Moses – Tomb of Osymandias – Character of Ramesesthe Great.

262

ABOUSIMBEL.

The Colossi – Portraits of Rameses the Great – The Great Sand-drift – The smaller Temples – 'Rameses and Nefertari' – TheGreat Temple – A monster tableau – Alone in the Great Temple – Trail ofa crocodile – Cleaning the Colossus – The sufferings of the sketcher.

284

THE SECONDCATARACT.

Volcanic mountains – Kalat Adda – Gebel esh-Shems – The firstcrocodile – Dull scenery – Wady Halfeh – The Rock of Abusir – The SecondCataract – The great view – Crocodile-slaying – Excavating atumulus – Comforts of home on the Nile.

311

DISCOVERIESAT ABOU SIMBEL.

Society at Abou Simbel – The Painter discovers a rock-cutchamber – Sunday employment – Reinforcement of natives – Excavation – TheSheykh – Discovery of human remains – Discovery of pylon andstaircase – Decorations of Painted Chamber – Inscriptions.

325

BACK THROUGH NUBIA.

Temples ad infinitum – Tosko – Crocodiles – Derr and Amadaagain – Wady Sabooah – Haughty beauty – A nameless city – A river ofsand – Undiscovered Temple – Maharrakeh – Dakkeh – Fortress ofKobban – Gerf Hossayn – Dendoor – Bayt-el-Welly – The Karnak ofNubia – Silco of the Ethiopians – Tafah – Dabôd – Baby-shooting – Adilemma – Justice in Egypt – The last of Philæ.

354

SILSILIS ANDEDFU.

Shooting the Cataract – Kom Ombo – Quarries of Silsilis – Edfuthe most perfect of Egyptian temples – View from the pylons – Sandcolumns.

390

THEBES.

Luxor again – Imitation 'Anteekahs' – Digging for Mummies – Tombs ofThebes – The Ramesseum – The granite Colossus – Medinet Habu – ThePavilion of Rameses III – The Great Chronicle – An Arabstory-teller – Gournah – Bab-el-Molûk – The shadowless Valley ofDeath – The Tombs of the Kings – Stolen goods – The French House – An Arabdinner and fantasia – The Coptic Church at Luxor – A Coptic service – ACoptic Bishop.

409

ABYDUS AND CAIRO.

Last weeks on the Nile – Spring in Egypt – Ninety-nine in theshade – Samata – Unbroken donkeys – The Plain of Abydus – Harvest-time – ABiblical idyll – Arabat the Buried – Mena – Origin of the EgyptianPeople – Temple of Seti – New Tablet of Abydus – Abydus andTeni – Kom-es-Sultan – Visit to a native Aga – The Hareem – Condition ofwomen in Egypt – Back at Cairo – 'In the name of the Prophet, Cakes!' – TheMôlid-en-Nebee – A human causeway – The Boulak Museum – PrinceRa-hotep and Princess Nefer-t – Early drive to Ghizeh – Ascent of theGreat Pyramid – The Sphinx – The view from the Top – The end.

466
APPENDIX.
I.A. M'Callum, Esq., to the Editor of 'THE TIMES'493
II.The EgyptianPantheon493
III.The Religious Belief of theEgyptians495
IV.Egyptian Chronology497
V.Contemporary Chronologyof Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Babylon499

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

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PAGE
GREAT ROCK-CUT TEMPLE, ABOU SIMBEL, NUBIA Frontispiece.
GERTÁSSEE Title-page.
THE SECRET OF THE SPHINX. After a Painting by ELIHU VEDDER, Esq. xvii
CAIRO DONKEY 4
TUNIS MARKET, CAIRO 7
CARPET BAZAAR, CAIRO 9
NATIVE CANGIAS45
HEAD OF TI 62
MITRÂHÎNEH 68
THE SHÂDÛF73
'HOLY SHEYKH COTTON' 78
MARKET BOAT MINIEH 87
GEBEL ABUFAYDA 92
RIVER-SIDE TOMBS NEAR SIÛT 98
SIÛT 99
GIRGEH 111
KASR ES SYAD 113
DENDERAH 117
CLEOPATRA 122
SHEYKH SELÎM 131
COLONNADE OF HOREMHEB, FROM A PHOTOGRAPHBY BRUGSCH-BEY 135
TEMPLE OF LUXOR 138
HYPOSTYLE HALL, KARNAK 149
TEMPLE OF ESNEH 161
NATIVE BOAT, ASSÛAN 173
CAMEL AT ASSÛAN 193
SOUDAN TRADERS AT MAHATTA 201
PHARAOH'S BED, PHILÆ 206
GRAND COLONNADE, PHILÆ 209
PAINTED COLUMNS, PORTICO OF LARGE TEMPLE, PHILÆ 217
EARLY CHRISTIAN SHRINE, PHILÆ 218
SHRINES OF OSIRIS, 1, 2, and 3227, 228
RESURRECTION OF OSIRIS 229
INSCRIBED MONOLITHIC ROCK, PHILÆ 232
TEMPLE OF DAKKEH, NUBIA 241
NUBIAN JEWELLERY 243
TEMPLE OF DERR, NUBIA 253
SAKKIEH, OR WATER-WHEEL 257
CARTOUCHES OF RAMESES THE GREAT263
RAMESES THE GREAT (Bayt-el-Welly)286
RAMESES THE GREAT (Abydus)286
RAMESES THE GREAT (Abou Simbel)286
PROFILE OF RAMESES II (From the Southernmost Colossus ; Abou Simbel) 287
SMALLER TEMPLE, ABOU SIMBEL, NUBIA 294
CLEANING THE COLOSSUS 308
WADY HALFEH 316
THE ROCK OF ABUSÎR 324
ENTRANCE OF SPEOS 331
GROUND-PLAN 338
PATTERN OF CORNICE 339
STANDARD OF HORUS AROËRIS 340
RAMESES II OF SPEOS 342
TEMPLE OF AMADA 357
TEMPLE OF WADY SABOOAH 359
HEAD-DRESS OF A KING 365
TEMPLE OF GERF HOSSAYN, NUBIA 371
TEMPLE OF DENDOOR 372
HEAD-DRESSES OF KINGS 374
TEMPLE OF KALABSHEH, NUBIA 375
RUINED TEMPLE AT TAFAH, NUBIA 378
TEMPLE OF DABÔD 381
RUINED CONVENT (COPTIC) NEAR PHILÆ 383
PHILÆ FROM THE SOUTH 388
NUBIAN WOMAN AND CHILD 389
TEMPLE OF KOM OMBO, UPPER EGYPT. 394
TA-UR-T (SILSILIS) 397
TA-UR-T (PHILÆ) 397
THE LOVELY ARAB MAIDEN. 408
DIGGING FOR MUMMIES 413
OSIRIDE COURT AND FALLEN COLOSSUS, RAMESSEUM, THEBES 419
PALACE ENTRANCE – MEDINET HABU 426
VASES AND GOBLETS, MEDINET HABU 427
OSIRIDE COURT, MEDINET HABU 433
THE 'FRENCH HOUSE.' LUXOR 452
COLUMNS OF AMENHOTEP III (LUXOR) 453
SAKKIEH AT SIÛT 481
'IN THE NAME OF THE PROPHET – CAKES!' 482
PRINCE RA-HOTEP AND PRINCESS NEFER-T 485
SPHINX AND PYRAMIDS 489
BROKEN SISTRUM 492

NOTES.

[Page x]

1 For the benefit of any whodesire more exact information, I may add that a table of averagetemperatures, carefully registered day by day and week by week, is to befound at the end of Mr. H. Villiers Stuart's 'Nile Gleanings.'[Note to Second Edition.]

[Page xv]

2 These dates, it is to beremembered, refer to the year 1877, when the first edition of this bookwas published. [Note to Second Edition.]

Initial scanning and proofing by Diane J. Donaldson, Kayla Johnson, and Mary Mark Ockerbloom

Final proofing and formatting by Mary Mark Ockerbloom at A Celebration of Women Writers.

Size and location of illustrations may vary somewhat from the original. Footnotes have been renumbered to reflect their ordering in each chapter, rather than their ordering on each page. (The original page number and footnote number can be seen by viewing the source code and looking at the NAME attribute of the note.)

Author: Stephanie Dray Submitted by: Maria Garcia 2160 Views View Chapter List Add a Review

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One of the Best Works of Stephanie Dray. published in multiple languages including English, consists of 398 pages and is available in Paperback format for offline reading.

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Song of the Nile PDF Details

Author: Stephanie Dray
Book Format: Paperback
Original Title: Song of the Nile
Number Of Pages: 398 pages
First Published in: October 4th 2011
Latest Edition: October 4th 2011
Series: Cleopatras Daughter #2
Language: English
Awards: RITA Award by Romance Writers of America Nominee for Novel with Strong Romantic Elements (2012)
Generes: Historical, Historical Fiction, Historical, Northern Africa, Egypt, Fantasy, Fiction, Young Adult, Romance, Historical Fiction, Historical Fantasy, Literature, Ancient, African Literature, Egyptian Literature,
Main Characters: Cleopatra Selene II
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